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Our Serviced Apartments in Westminster

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Book our serviced apartments online, or reach out to our reservations team on: stay@viridianapartments.com / +44 (0)20 3743 0331

Welcome to Westminster

Vast cultural traditions reign supreme in Westminster, hosting some of London’s most famous attractions such as Buckingham Palace, Big Ben, the London Eye, Westminster Abbey and the Palace of Westminster (Houses of Parliament) just to name a few. Tourists head to the ‘changing of the guards at the horse guard parade, whilst corporate travellers benefit from the amazing centrality and ease of travel around the capital. Our guests here enjoy the restaurants and bars lining the River Thames and the hustle and bustle of this exciting neighbourhood. You are in the very heart of London here…

Victoria - Vincent Square/Bloomburg Street
Prices from
1 Standard Studio, 1 Bathroom : £145.00
1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom : £199.00
2 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom : £239.00
Victoria - Westrovia
Prices from
1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom : £180.00
2 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom : £260.00

Don’t miss out - book online now

There are three ways to book your Viridian Apartments apartment:

  • Book online now
  • Fill out an enquiry form for follow up
  • Contact our team to chat through requirements.
    By phone (during office hours) +44 (0)20 3743 0331 or by email

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Highlights of Westminster

Westminster Abbey
Admire the beautiful Gothic architecture of this UNESCO World Heritage Site. Literature lovers should visit Poets' Corner, commemorating over 100 writers including Shakespeare, Dickens, and Austen.
The London Eye
Europe's tallest cantilevered observation wheel is an iconic symbol of the London skyline. Hop into a capsule to take in breathtaking views of the city.
Buckingham Palace
Visit the King's official London residence and view the regular Changing the Guard ceremony.
St James's Park
Go pelican-spotting in this Grade I listed royal park - the water birds have been a famous feature of the park since a Russian ambassador donated them to Charles II in 1664.